Chronic Illness Blogs

Diets For Different Illnesses

I wanted to do a blog to help those with diet issues with different illnesses and some easy go-to foods. I have done a lot of research into this on various websites such as Crohns and Colitis UK, Colostomy UK, NHS Top Diets Review, The British Dietetic Association, GIFT UK and various social media platforms.

The First Diet that I was really interested in after reading is the Blood Type Diet. From the research that I have done, it has shown to be a diet specified to your blood type. Peter. J D’Adamo suggests that the foods you eat reacts chemically with your blood type, so following a diet to your blood type may help you to digest food more efficiently and to help you lose weight, have more energy and help prevent disease;

Blood Type O: High protein diet especially lean meats (such as chicken and turkey), Fish, Vegetables. You also want to be light on foods such as grains, beans and dairy. It is said that people in the Blood Type O category suffer from tummy troubles and should take supplements.

Blood Type A: A meat free diet is recommended for this blood type, eating lots of fruits and vegetables, whole grains. It is also said that people in the Blood Type A category suffer from a weakened sensitive system.

Blood Type B: A diet avoiding corn, wheats, lentils, tomatoes, peanuts and sesame seeds. Chicken can be troublesome for those in the Blood Type B category too so eating things like eggs, green veg, other meats and low fat dairy.

Blood Type AB: This diet is more focused on tofu, seafood, dairy and green vegetables. People in the Blood Type AB category tend to have low stomach acids so it’s important to avoid caffeine, alcohol and smoked meats.

It is important that if you have an illness/disease that may prevent you from eating some of these specific blood type diets.

So let’s look at another diet that could be possible such as the Low Sugar Diet.

This diet focuses on certain food groups such as :

  • Fruits and vegetables.
  • Bread, rice, potatoes, pasta and cereals.
  • Meat, fresh fish, eggs and beans.
  • Milk and dairy foods.

Avoiding sugar is very crucial when you are a diabetic so always check the label of the food you are going to be buying. Ideally, you want a fat content of less than 100g, sugar content less than 5g per 100g and salt content of 0.3g per 100g. On occasion you can have the following:

  • fat content at 17.5g per 100g or more.
  • sugar content at 22.5g per 100g or more.
  • salt content 1.5g per 100g or more.

Advice from the British Dietetic Association is to try and snack when you are hungry, in between meals, and not just due to food being there. Try to drink something first before eating and sometimes we often mistake hunger for thirst. Also try not to buy things during your food shop which you know is your ‘danger foods’ that exceed the contents limits.

Diet advice on the Crohns and Colitis Uk website for people who suffer from Inflammatory Bowel Disease; by specialist Lisa Macleman.

“Excess calories can result in weight gain however if underweight then this is positive thing. If you are overweight it is important to avoid excess calories. Weight gain and loss is a huge problem for people who suffer from IBD, due to remission and flares. When in a flare people with IBD tend to eat easy go-to foods because it is needed for energy. When in a flare it is important to eat small portions frequently which is around 6 or 7 little meals per day.”

Many people claim that certain diets or foods can cure Crohns Disease and Ulcerative Colitis however there is no scientific evidence to support this, however diets can help someone achieve remission but never a cure, as for many illnesses. It can be helpful to recognise your trigger foods such as high fibre foods, spicy foods or other foods.

A Low Residue Diet can help when a IBD sufferer is experiencing a flare up of their disease, which many dieticians do recommend to try.

So What is a Low Residue Diet?

  • Bread, cereal and nuts – sweet plain biscuits such as rich teas, gingernut and NICE biscuits. Plain cake made from white flour. Plain crackers such as cream crackers. Smooth peanut butter.
  • Fruit and vegetables – Tinned or ripe fresh fruit that contain no seeds and have no skins on (only 2 portions of fruit per day), fruit juices and smooth coconut milk. Vegetables without skins, smooth or sieved tomatoes, strained vegetable juices, mashed potato and baked potato without eating the skin.
  • Desserts – Custard, ice cream, milk puddings, clear jelly and plain cakes.
  • Dairy – Milk (low fat is recommended), low fat cream, sour cream, creme fraiche, smooth yoghurt and cheese.
  • Drinks – Fruit, vegetable juices, milk, water, dioralyte (rehydration), soft drinks, decaffeinated tea and coffee and herbal tea.
  • Meat and meat alternatives for vegans – all meats and fish (less fat are better.)
  • Miscellaneous – eggs, tofu, soup, honey, jelly, jam, crisps and plain pretzels.

The Specific Carbohydrate Diet (SCD.)

This diet specifically is restricting you intake of carbs, by eliminating certain food types such as grains, starches, dairy and sugar. The benefits to this diet are good for someone who suffers from digestive inflammation, eating foods that require minimal digestion which can reduce inflammation. It is said that following this diet can also cause some nutritional deficiencies so always ask your doctor first. Investing in supplements and vitamins is really important on this diet.

Foods that are allowed on this diet:

  • Fresh vegetables.
  • Poultry, fish and eggs.
  • Natural cheeses.
  • Home made yoghurt.
  • Fruit and fruit juices without additives.
  • Coconut oil, olive oil and corn oil.
  • Weak tea and coffee
  • Unflavoured gelatin.
  • Mustard and vinegar.

This diet still needs more research into it but if you have tried it, I would love to hear your feedback – good or bad!

I think it is really interesting to see what research there is out there when it comes to diets and what may be able to help you but as I have said, ALWAYS consult your doctor first!

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