Awareness, Chronic Illness Blogs, Life With A Stoma, Mental Health Blogs, Uncategorized

The Blue Badge Scheme

image

The Blue Badge scheme is a disabled parking permit but more commonly known as a disabled badge. This is where a blue badge is visible in your vehicle window to allow you or the person transporting you to park in disabled parking spaces.

How to qualify?

I’m asked this question quite frequently, as recent as just last month. It’s difficult to know if you are eligible and how to get one so I gathered my information and will pop it down below (please note that some councils policies on your eligibility can differ so always consult them):

  • If you are under the age of 16 and have a letter confirming your eligibility from your visual impairment team (eye care specialists.)
  • if you are 16 or over and you are registered as visually impaired.
  • if you are receiving the higher rate of mobility component from DLA (Disability Living Allowance.)
  • if you are receiving PIP (Personal Independence Payment) and have scored 8 or more points in the ‘moving around’ in the assessment.
  • if you are receiving PIP (Personal Independence Payment) and have scored 12 points or more for the ‘planning and following a journey’ in the assessment.
  • If you are receiving ‘war pensioners’ mobility supplement.
  • if you have gotten a ‘lump sum payment’ from tariffs 1-8 of the Armed Forces Compensation Scheme.

If you have any of the above then you automatically qualify for a Blue Badge! If you don’t then click here where you can do an eligibility assessment online. You will need your national insurance number for this if you have one.

How to apply?

You can apply directly through the link up above or you can call your local council and request this to be done on your behalf over the phone and then visit your local council with documents to prove your identity, address and proof of benefits you are currently receiving such as :

  • a utility bill
  • passport
  • drivers license
  •  birth certificate
  • council tax bill or government letter
  • letters from DWP of your current benefits
  • a recent passport sized photograph (for the badge)

Once you have done this, the process time is usually 12 weeks but depending on your local council it could be a little longer, they will email you to let you know! How you pay and how much you pay also depends on who and where is your council for example in Scotland it is £20 and in England it is £10 and for wales its completely free.

What are the benefits of having a Blue Badge?

Having a Blue Badge can be very beneficial if you are disabled such as parking at on street parking meters, parking in pay and displays, parking at disabled parking spaces and on single and double yellow lines if there are no loading restrictions (all of these are completely free!) This does not apply when parking at shopping centre car parks, hospital car parks (if they charge) and super markets (if they charge.) You can also use your badge all over the UK and abroad, in England and Wales you must use a parking clock.

Displaying your Blue Badge

It is important to display your Blue Badge so that when near your vehicle, someone can see it clearly from outside the vehicle and the front of the badge must be facing upwards showing the name of your local council.

If you have any issues with losing your badge or it has been stolen please contact your local council ASAP to get this resolved. Please also note that giving your Blue Badge to someone who is not entitled to one or is not helping you can be charged with committing a blue badge fraud and fined up to £1000 EVEN if they are family or friends. DO NOT buy your blue badge anywhere online where it states the price is £49 as there are SO many fraud websites scamming people and are fake. If you get a fake blue badge you are also at risk of being fined up to £1000.

I hope you found this useful in answering your questions about the Blue Badge Scheme!

Awareness, Chronic Illness Blogs, Life With A Stoma, ostomy fashion, Stoma Wear Brands

Ostomy Fashion – Best Buys

20190406181931_IMG_0452

Many ostomates dress differently due to two things; fear of the bag showing and losing confidence. I asked some ostomates their favourite pieces of clothing to wear when dressing with a stoma, at an affordable price, as let’s face it – we aren’t made of money! (Picture above, I got my dress from SHEIN for £15!)

I admit, when I first became an ostomate back in 2015, it was summer and I had no clue what to wear (I was just 20 years young at that time.) I was fearful of my bag showing, my scars being visible and I lacked all that confidence I once had before I got severely  unwell. I am here to tell you that you CAN wear whatever you want or feel like wearing – whether you want your bag to be concealed or on show! There are two of my favourite ostomy wear companies that you can get briefs that hold your bag in place such as Vanilla Blush which focuses on being sexy at the same time, and for hernia support there is Comfizz which are more practical than sexy but work excellent!

If you are a new ostomate reading this, welcome! Here you will find some great buys from fellow ostomates and hope that this helps you. Feel free to get in touch should you need any more advice! It is a lot to take in, but take it day by day and relax, cus’ we got you covered in the clothing department <3.

78792609_618050882335648_5547343594274509669_n(1)

First up we have the lovely Amy also known as the IBDWarriorPrincess who is also my friend and a blogger for Comfizz! “My Style since getting a stoma has changed, but for the better. Now because I can maintain my weight and actually go out. I look forward to going clothes shopping and dressing in the clothes that I love! I swear by high waisted garments because they don’t restrict my ostomy or stop it from it’s normal functions. My favourite go-to outfit is a tight top and a skater skirt, especially on the days where my stoma is more active!” This Jumpsuit was just £12 from Newlook.

82852962_749460718915897_2491240366376747008_o

Nicola also known as Beauty and The Bag, is not afraid to have her own sense of style with her ostomy! As a mum of 7 she looks fantastic! “I get pretty much all of my clothes from boohoo and absolutely love the styles I can create! I don’t dress around my stoma or try to hide it.. I wear whatever I feel good in and I like to look a little unique and stand out.”

83395735_2809630929082749_4052863661721518080_n

Lisa who has her own ostomy fashion instagram account lisakateostomate, sharing other ostomy fashion and bargain buys! Lisa has really struggled recently due to being on steroids to try and help her Chronic Illnesses with her weight, but doesn’t she look amazing! ” Always have shopped at primark, quiz and new look. My go to shops for my clothes and they’re all true to size. I’m usually a 12-14.” We think you look lovely whatever size you are Lisa.

82226785_187096959084963_5580879206361359626_n(1)

Jess is no stranger to an ostomy as this isn’t her first once after a failed J-Pouch! Jess finally got the chance to dress up for new year this year after being in hospital on and off for the past few months. This dress is from I Saw It First retailer at £25. She also has an instagram account that you can follow her – jessgoldstraw.

EPMSdtGW4AItZbk

Sandie loves her comfy trousers which she bought from TK Maxx at just £19.99! “I have made many purchases but I am so glad (more so) on the purchase of these trousers which got me through the first few weeks after surgery.” And I agree definitely a bargain buy!  You can follow Sandie on twitter – sandicookartist.

80739187_1931926146952114_7489151721621253376_n

Sophie who is a mother of one and is the face behind the ostomy clothing brand I Am Denim London models her own jeans here. Now these are on the higher range of ostomy wear so these do cost a little bit more. These jeans I would really recommend for those of you have a higher stoma! This includes men too! These are currently on sale at £75. Perfect for keeping you ostomy concealed if you are self conscious too (they have a waistband inside that is adapted so you can still empty your pouch without having to undress!)

82131255_2502142836740305_5359608563831924130_n

Last of all is my bargain buy! These ex Zara jeans I got on ebay for £6.99! I have a low stoma so these cause me no issues on rubbing on the stoma or when my bag fills up. They are super stretchy and soft. I have no issues having my stoma on show or hidden, however when wearing jumpsuits or dresses, I do wear my Vanilla Blush briefs to keep everything in place!  You can follow my instagram – glitterygutsx 

Let me know what your bargain buys are OR your favourite outfit with a stoma! Feel free to tag me on social media so I can share with the rest of my followers!

Thank You to the girls who participated in this blog piece, in hope to help new and old ostomates!

Chronic Illness Blogs, Mental Health Blogs, Personal Blogs

Fabulous Freebies!

FB_IMG_1553391037843

Good evening everyone! This blog post is about/links to some fabulous freebies I  had found whilst scrolling through the hotukdeals app on my phone!

To find the freebies, simply go onto the hotukdeals website or onto the app and click the ‘freebies‘ tab. There you will find loads of freebies such as apps, books, food, items, free games to download on various gaming consoles and PC and more. There were a few that caught my eye more than others because I knew they would be beneficial to people who either have a chronic illness, insomnia or have felt the burn of the recent benefit cuts. Bare in mind that when you read this a week or a month I have posted that the following might not be available anymore or the deal has expired so do keep an eye on the expiry date of the free offer!

So my eye catching freebie favourites!

Of course there isn’t just this website to get good deals, there is alo Groupon and Wowcher. They both do great meal deals and holiday deals MUCH cheaper than what you pay in the restaurant and at travel agents! Keep an eye for helpful apps I managed to get a painting by colour (not painting by colours brand) app where you can paint pictures like mandala on your phone and save them! Great for when insomnia strikes!

I will be doing more research to see what freebies I can get up for next week and will doa another blog post then! If you have any good websites to recommend that are alike – get in touch! Thankyou!

Awareness, Chronic Illness Blogs, People's Stories!

Aberdeenshire Barbers Volunteer at NHS

Untitled (75)

Two barbers from Hombre in Aberdeenshire, Liam and and Brandon have been assisting the elderly and ill patients at Aberdeen Royal Infirmary once a week.

Liam Robertson (23) who has been there for 4 years, came up with the idea to assist patients at ARI that are unable to leave the hospital with Brandan Milne (18) who started a year ago. Liam reached out to the hospital about volunteering at the ward, as they are off from the barbers on a Tuesday. They now spend their day off at the hospital giving haircuts to patients at the green zone. Liams main purpose and what strived him to start volunteering was to give back to those in the community who can’t manage to get anywhere especially their barbers shop and felt he was the man for giving back!

“I felt this time of year it’s important to help those that either don’t have families or can’t see them due to age/illness. The patients were elderly, the smile and extra enjoyment after having a chat with us and feeling normal again felt amazing. Our plan was to try make them feel relaxed and trying. To take their mind off things for a little while.”

The two men take their own supplies and make their own ways to the hospital for 11am, finishing at 4:30pm. Through the day, they see patients who are unable to leave the hospital and struggle to maintain with simple tasks that many of us can do without any problems and take for granted, including keeping up with their hair and facial hair. Nurses care for their patients every day with medicine, clean bedding and assist with washing however they are so stretched with time and funding that it is not possible for them to hire a barber or take patients out to a barber for the patients who are able. Not only are the nurses at the ward very grateful and appreciative of Liam and Brandan’s selfless and passionate work every tuesday, many other social media pages have thanked them!

When I asked Liam what was the best part about the day, he said how the mood and atmosphere changes of the patient’s from when they first arrive to the end of the day – “everyone had that extra kick and they became very warming.”

I think this is absolutely fantastic and patients can have such a confidence boost, as a chronic illness sufferer I know how difficult it can be being stuck in hospital and I know fellow chronic illness sufferers can relate! It’s also fantastic to see the young part of our generation spending their free time helping those in need.

nhs brandan

NHS Grampian Acute Sector 

nhs liam

Fubar News

Friends and family of the two men have also shown their support via social media platforms, as well as family of patients!

To anyone who has thought about doing something similar or are young and haven’t yet thought about volunteering, Liam says the following: 

“I strongly believe we’re all far too caught up in our own lives and it is time that we start giving back, even with something small. Doing something small will make a massive impact in someone else’s life. It’s nice to be nice!” 

Awareness, Chronic Illness Blogs, Life With A Stoma, Personal Blogs

BBC Radio Brain waves

PW2019-403

After talking with the lovely Pennie from BBC Radio Scotland, we had a cuppa at my home and recorded some conversations on topics for the Brainwaves Podcast edition for Series 7 in 2020.

In Pennie’s Brainwaves series, she explores the science behind our everyday experiences and shares this with scientists who work in Scotland. The first series which started in 2014, covers topics such as Edinburgh Science Festival, Obesity Figures in Scotland. Series 2 covers topics such as how sounds affect people, meeting and talking with scientists and professors and meeting Karen Vousden, director of Cancer Research. Series 3 covers topics such as Biometrics, The Psychology of Cheating, Donating your body to science and The Flu virus. Series 4 covers topics such as The Northern Lights, Antimicrobial Resistance and the Anatomy of a stroke. Series 5 covers topics such as The problem with plastic, The Invisible Disease and Child Tissue Donation. Series 6 which covers various topics such as Food For Thought, Street Drugs and Pain.

Series 7 which is set to be released early 2020, is currently being recorded. Subjects include a shocking insight into the prevalence of perinatal PTSD, a real eye opener on what might be the next big environmental pollution issue plus a few good, bad and ugly facts about fat.

I am VERY excited for you all to hear our one which covers many subjects! When it is published, I will make sure to update you all!

 

 

Awareness, Chronic Illness Blogs, Mental Health Blogs, People's Stories!, Personal Blogs

The Mental Health Taboo With Pregnancy

68618324_716981562081886_7125175591002701824_n

After watching Loose Women, a celeb dating star Anna Williamson talked about her mental health before pregnancy, during and after the birth of her first child. Anna was extremely brave in talking about something that society has a set perspective on when it comes to pregnancy and having a family which is that pregnancy should be the most exciting and amazing time of your life. But that isn’t how it is for many who suffer from mental health conditions.

In my blog IBD – Pregnancy/Termination I talked about my situation when I became pregnant after being told I would never be able to get pregnant and to help other women in the same situation I was in which was that I was told this information based on opinion and through no fertility testing. However I never talked about the emotional impact this had and STILL has on me. It’s hard, and that’s putting it lightly. Since then I have had another miscarry and I am desperate to be a mum. They say to look at that silver lining and for us, it’s that I know I can get pregnant now!

I spoke to women and men who also felt that mental health had a big role to play prior, during and after pregnancy;

Kellie

“It felt like I was going to fail as a mom. When I was pregnant over three years ago, four months before falling pregnant I had my stoma operation. My surgeon was very concerned which made me concerned and panic. There were regular what ifs and what if this baby didn’t make it as I had had 5 miscarriages. At ten weeks, my whole life was on pause as they didn’t know if I would survive, they diagnosed me with a brain condition and I went blind for three months. I was in such a dark place I didn’t know if I was going to make it, I kept asking myself was my baby going to make it, or if we did pull through how would I cope being a mom with a new illness on top of the illnesses I already have!”

“Pregnancy was no walk in the park for me, and I couldn’t be alone. I was scared to be left alone so my partner would come to the hospital everyday and be with me from 7am that morning till 11pm at night. I had to stay on the phone to him all night just to try and stay as calm as possible. I was also on different types of medication as they didn’t know if the baby would come out addicted to the medications or not. I wasn’t on medication by choice, I was on medications to try and survive and for the baby to survive. I had open brain surgery at 20 weeks pregnant and I honestly thought when I was being put to sleep that it would be the last time I would see my family. I didn’t bond with my son for a few months and unfortunately, it took longer for me to bond with him as all I did was sleep and eat. My partner actually had him the majority of the time after major bowel surgery, being ill, open brain surgery and being a new first time mom. Delivering conor I was all over the place between hormones. I really didn’t know if I was coming or going. When I got better and when I was allowed to go home, I was close to my due date and I kept having panic attacks thinking something was going to happen to the baby or myself. I couldn’t sleep, I was restless, I was alone.”
Laura

“I’ve been on maximum dose antidepressants for depression and anxiety since the age of 14. When I became pregnant in 2010, I was seen at the hospital regarding my medication. They advised me to either come off my medication or to switch to one that would have less effects on the baby. My anxiety told me to stop my medication completely, I couldn’t bare the thought of any medication having a negative impact on this little person I was growing. The first few weeks weren’t too bad, I found myself either feeling on cloud 9 and the happiest person alive or I then felt myself pushing everyone away and isolating myself. I kept blaming it on pregnancy hormones and carried on as I was. My baby was born prematurely in April 2011 via emergency caesarean. Nothing prepared me for that, and especially for what was to follow. I blamed myself entirely. I blamed myself for my tiny baby being in high dependency. I felt like I had failed him, my body had failed him, and for weeks I bottled these feelings up and tried my hardest to embrace my new role as a mother.”

“When I finally brought my baby home, I made sure he was clean, fed, loved and my god did I love him. But there was always this overwhelming feeling inside that I wasn’t good enough. I truly believed that I didn’t deserve this baby and didn’t deserve to feel happy. I told myself I didn’t love him enough. I struggled in silence for 6 months before admitting that I needed help. I openly told my doctor “I can’t do this” and the GP put me back on to antidepressants. It has taken me so long to accept that I need these tablets to function and to stabilise my emotions. It has taken me so long to accept that I was and am worthy of this special boy. I am no longer ashamed of my mental health issues and I need to take these tablets to make life easier for me and keep those intrusive thoughts at bay then I do! I was also so in love with him but I remember those unwanted and intrusive thoughts creeping in, telling me I wasn’t good enough for this and that I didn’t deserve this beautiful baby boy.”

Danielle

“Before I fell pregnant, apart from the desperation and obsession with becoming pregnant, my mental health was quite good. I was always able to control it and get on top of it myself. Never felt I needed to seek much help and always dealt with life’s shit pretty well. But it’s like something changed in me when I became pregnant, I was petrified of losing my unborn baby! SO petrified that I was adamant it was going to happen.
I didn’t really enjoy pregnancy much until 20 weeks. I don’t know why but that 20 week scan made me feel like I could breathe a bit and my unborn baby boy was healthy and he was actually going to be OK. But that horrible anxious feeling never fully went away, I think that’s because I didn’t have a lot of trust in my body, seen as though it had thrown a chronic illness at me out of the blue. Despite all my concerns and issues, besides initial worries from labour, he was a healthy baby boy. I don’t know if my pregnancy anxiety is to blame for my mental health declining once I had him. He had Cmpa ( a food allergy caused by the baby’s immune system reacting to proteins in cow’s milk) from birth so we had our issues and battles which was never easy. He wasn’t diagnosed for weeks and I felt like I was losing an uphill battle with medical professionals. I struggled so much from early on because he screamed, a lot, and wasn’t a happy baby. I felt so stressed and angry All. The. Time, A time that I was meant to be enjoying my new baby boy it was awful some days.”

“Even though I wasn’t alone I felt very alone, very scared, both judged and a very bad mum! I was petrified to talk to anyone about how I really felt incase I was judged! I was so scared someone would take my baby off me and think he would be better off with someone else. I did go to the Drs a few times, trying to explain how I felt but I kept getting dismissed and I lost faith in them. Eventually, nearly 2 years after having him! 2 whole years, I felt like I was losing my mind and I wasn’t a very nice person to be around. I couldn’t control my anger or my emotions. I felt so lost and so far from myself it was unreal! I took my sister to the Drs with me who thankfully listened. I self referred from there advice to try CBT. I give it a good go, I tried a few appointments and stuck to it, but still felt myself sinking. My son was well over 2 now and he deserved so much more than what I was giving him! So I went against everything I once believed in, and asked for antidepressants. I was scared of those because I didn’t want to feel numb, I didn’t want to be emotionless towards my son or partner, but I NEEDED something and fast. So 11 months I have been on them now, and my God what a difference!! I’m quite saddened to think I lost myself for so long and got such an important chunk of my little boys life, and I know, which is also proven, that my mental health WOULD of had an effect on him because I left it too long. But I pray and I hope with everything in me, I have time to reverse any damage and soon enough, before the years out, I’ll be medication free and coping OK. Nobody tells you about this part of pregnancy and being a parent, not peppery. You never expect it to happen to you. But it can happen to anyone. And please don’t do what I did, don’t try cope and don’t ignore it. Ask for help, no-one is there to judge you, only to help you.”
Zoe

“My experiences with a newborn – I went into it expecting it to be the most amazing and wonderful experience in the whole world: especially after all the ivf and how longed for our baby was, I thought it would be magical. And don’t get me wrong, it was wonderful, but wow it was so hard too! The physical exhaustion of having a newborn affected me more than anything. I was breastfeeding for the first 2 and a half weeks, and he would feed constantly. And I mean constantly. There was no physical time left in the day for me to sleep. I was beyond exhausted. I was losing control of my mind, I felt like I was ghosting my body, like I wasn’t there. I felt like looking after my baby was a chore. I didn’t feel like I could enjoy even the cuddles. It wasn’t until I started bottle feeding, where Harry actually enjoyed being put down, I could actually sleep, and I got my sanity back. When he was breastfeeding, he would only settle on me, he would only sleep on me. It was relentless. I didn’t want to tell anyone, I felt like I was failing and I had to keep my front.”
Debbie

“I have recently had 3 miscarriages, and during my pregnancies with both my daughters in 2007 and 2008, I had strep B with severe sickness. Due to severe depression which I was diagnosed with in 2009, my two girls were taken away and have been adopted. I found it hard to manage simple things like cooking, couldn’t eat without being sick so ended up being anemic for a while, I couldn’t get much sleep as I was always lay awake worrying. Due to this awful experiences, I have ended up not trusting professionals and I still don’t. I was always worrying something bad was going happen and this has affected my mental health long term.”

(this gentleman is being kept anonymous)

“I find men don’t know what to expect during pregnancy, and I personally found that when going into the hospital with my partner, I was ignored by the staff. They don’t tell you what to expect or how it’s going to be. When we had my youngest, my partner was on gas and air and I sat there doing nothing until she went into labour, nobody talked to me or said what to do or helped me cope with it all. I think because we aren’t the patient, we are left to it which I think is unfair as it’s an experience to go through together as a couple.”
Amy

I have never been very maternal, yes I wanted children, I wanted one each a boy and girl, but for me I had to be a lot older, successful and married. Obviously fate had a different idea. I fell pregnant 3 months after dating my boyfriend, it was mid Jan 2015 when I found out. I had just landed a full time permanent job and this really put a spanner in the works. It was a shock, this wasn’t planned and I didn’t know my boyfriend that well enough either. Even though my pregnancy was a shock, I knew then and there I was sticking with this pregnancy. My boyfriend however wasn’t so keen on the idea. I broke the news to my parents and apart from an initial shock the next day they both supported me with whatever I decided. My boyfriend took a whole week to tell his parents and they weren’t thrilled either. Back then I think I should of left him as the warning signs were all there.

My pregnancy wasn’t easy at the slightest, I’m 4ft9, I was about 5 and a half stone then, so growing a baby left me in a lot of pain. I was sick constantly and was back and forth in A&E as I was so dehydrated and had constant drips to help with that. I had sickness throughout until I actually went into labour. My boyfriend came to terms with things but wasn’t at all in the slightest encouraging. He came to most of the scans, as did my family but he wasn’t overwhelmed with emotion like we were. Anyway we got prepared and minus the sickness and needing constant growth scans, (as for a while baby was growing quite small) things were fine and dandy. My due date was 4th October 2015. I got told I wouldn’t be on time and would be late, however on the 14th September, I was getting a lot of pain and started bleeding. On the 15th pain was worse and my mum decided to time them and low and behold I was actually starting labour. The labour ward got me in when my contractions were about a minute apart and after a quick sweep and realising I was already 4cm dilated, I had a birth pool running and we were in hospital. 16th September 2015 at 7:56am my daughter was born at a beautiful 6lb4oz. Apart from being a bit blue and mucusy she was fine and after 24 hours we went home. This was when things went bad. My partner moved in with me in my parents house, but they just couldn’t get on. He hardly helped with our daughter and at this point I became quite poorly myself as was having a lot of stomach pain. It got so bad at one point I had to get an ambulance round. No-one could work out what was wrong so was put on some painkillers. Day 5 of my daughter’s life and after a few days of her being jaundice my midwife and health visitor told me to get her to hospital and myself as well as I was running a fever and not being well. So we did. We both got admitted in.

My daughter was poked and prodded with numerous tests and she was rushed straight to NICU as her bilirubin levels were dangerously high. We were told if they continue to rise that she may have brain or organ failure. We were told to expect the worst if things didn’t improve in 24 hours. She was put in all uv lighting. She had tubes going everywhere and the tiniest cannula ever. This was when my mental health went bad. My heart was breaking in so many ways. How can this happen? I’ve only had her in my life for 5 days, you can’t take her away from me now. Will she live? Will she have permanent problems? How am I going to cope? Why the hell has this gotten so bad? I was distraught and worse I was admitted in and until they can figure out what was wrong with me, I wasn’t allowed to be in nicu. I was breastfeeding so I needed to be there so I could do that. They allowed me for that reason but after 2 days my bloods came back saying I had an infection and while that was going on I no longer could be there. So I expressed. But I wasn’t making much sense, which then made me cry my eyes out as I couldn’t even do one simple thing for my daughter. The hospital was amazing. They made sure I was being checked on and keeping me updated constantly about my daughter. I had the mental health team round as my scoring was very bad so they sent the support, but I refused, I just wanted to be with my daughter. Her father hardly went to see her, he was more interested in playing his game or sleep. At one point he saw her for about 10 minutes and then went off with his family to get a pizza, not once asking if I needed anything.

My parents, especially my mum, were there being my support group that they always are, they made sure I was coping and being there with my girl while I couldn’t. They gave me things so I had her smell and she had mine. Regardless though, I still felt alone, so lonely, so lost, so hopeless, so frustrated and so very angry. I just want my baby home and well. Somehow a miracle did happen and after 2 and a half weeks we were home. We had another month of tests to make sure nothing creeped back but she was safe. But even being home my low mood didn’t budge. I instead worried every time she was asleep.

It is incredibly brave for these people to share their stories over the past few months and to share via this blog post. The main aim in sharing these stories is for those who are in similar situations with mental health whilst being a parent’s or parent’s to be to not feel so alone. It’s OK not to be OK at any time in your life! Just make sure to reach out and get the help and support that you need, whether that be in a friend, family member or medical professional.

Chronic Illness Blogs, Mental Health Blogs

How To Pass The Time On Bad Days

It may seem a strange to blog about how to pass time when you are having a bad day, but in reality time really does go slow when you are having a bad day, for example with pain or mental health. Many of us are guilty of trying to pass the time by scrolling through social media and find that it can sometimes make you feel worse or if it’s really late and no one is online, it can make you feel quite lonely.

So how can we pass the time during these difficult times?

  • Apps such as Pinterest, the Kindle App, YouTube, Sky Go and games that you like or may like to try.
  • Gaming on your laptop, PC or gaming consoles (for cheaper prices on games visit cdkeys.com)
  • Colouring in or diamond painting (you can get these cheap on eBay)
  • Picking a new hobby such as photography or walking if able.
  • Doing D.I.Y projects that are within your limits such as revamping an old mirror or old furniture.
  • Visiting the beach if it isn’t a cold day! The sea air smell and sounds are so relaxing that you don’t need to walk around the beach to enjoy it, just sitting with a flask of tea or coffee watching the sea is lovely.
  • Doing crafts, many people make beautiful things such as hats, scarves, sculptures and scrabble pictures.

For more ideas on what you can learn to do, visit google or Pinterest where there are so many ideas to choose from!

Please also remember that should you need to rest and sleep a few or many hours a day, do not feel guilty! I spend a lot of hours per day sleeping or napping and I always remind myself that listening to your own body is so important. On the good days, make the best of them! After a day of sleeping, I try to get my housework done and if the weather is nice then I like to go for a little walk with my pooches. Each day is very different, if not every hour so do what you can when able and try not to be hard on yourself.💕

Chronic Illness Blogs, Mental Health Blogs

Looking At The Positives

Alannahedit-3

Hello all, it’s been a while hasn’t it! I hope you are all doing well and my apologies for being so quiet this last little while.

So what’s new? Not much is new really! I had my implant removed finally which is slowly improving my acne. My mental health really hasn’t been good at all as it’s been a very stressful month or so and I have taken quite a bit of time out for myself to focus on family and friends. I have to admit that I’m not quite 100% and need to revisit my GP for a referral to get more mental health help but I have fantastic support from Jaimie, his parents and my parents. Having the dogs around has been my cushion when I fall, when the world feels like all hope is gone- there they are with a lovely soft cuddle and lots of kisses. As for moving house, I have decided that it just isn’t the right time due to the stress moving causes so I’m happy to stay where we are. It gave me the push I needed, though, to declutter my wardrobes etc! Biggie had his operation to remove his manhood and has recovered well and is now a little water baby and it is so, so cute!

Now, it’s about trying to get more into N.O stands for ‘Next Opportunity’ and focusing on the positives. A break from things like social media (and if you are a blogger, then blogging too) does you the world of good. I had a few issues with others trying to shed me in a public negative way and after so long I told myself that enough was enough and I deserved better and to only surround myself with good people who care about me and my wellbeing and what a lovely bunch they are! Even people that I don’t know who follow my blog and social media’s have been incredibly supportive and I thank you all so much. At the moment I will be doing some blogging here and there and remain to write articles for the Stoma Tips Magazine and possibly work on some blog contributions in the next few weeks.

Health wise i.e my Crohn’s Disease etc hasn’t been ideal but I’m coping. The Chronic Migraines has been the worst alongside Chronic Sinusitis and Arthritis but I have listened to my body and rested when I can, mostly watching Harry Potter! I also binge watched the new season 3 of 13 Reasons Why and Euphoria which were brilliant. Things can only get better and I will do my best to make sure of it! I also need to start watching That Crohns Chick more, if you aren’t subscribed to her Youtube Channel you can do so by clicking here to check it out!

A big thank you for reading and supporting me.

-Alannah

 

 

Awareness, Chronic Illness Blogs, Uncategorized

Where Did HIV and AIDS Come From?

Untitled (24)

After watching the documentary about Freddie Mercury and the film Bohemian Rhapsody, I wanted to find out more about where the diseases HIV and AIDS came from. The impact that these two diseases have brought to people in several countries was and has been catastrophic.

Let’s talk about HIV and AIDS – 

HIV broken down is Human Immunodeficiency Virus which attacks the immune system and becomes AIDS, was first discovered in America in the 1980’s. At first people didn’t know what to call the disease and referred to is as ‘gay’ due to the fact that gay men were reporting to have rare diseases such as Kaposi’s Sarcoma and a lung infection called PCP which were linked to this unknown disease.

AIDS broken down is Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome and is the most advanced stage of HIV.  Someone with AIDS has both HIV and at least one of a specific list of ‘AIDS-defining’ diseases, which include tuberculosis, pneumonia and some types of cancer.

In 1983 the death rate from HIV was 16,500 which raised in 2006 when the death rate went up to 2,000,000. In 1999 scientists found a strain of SIV in a chimpanzee which was very similar to HIV which affected humans and it was then proven that HIV had come from chimpanzees after contamination from chimpanzee to human. But how did the chimpanzee get SIV? Scientists conducted even more research into how the monkey’s got SIV in the first place and soon realised that a chimpanzee had eaten two other similar and smaller monkey’s, in which each monkey had a different strain of SIV. Due to this chimpanzee eating two monkey’s with a different strain of SIV each, combined this turned into a third virus which can affect humans known as HIV.

So how did humans become contaminated with HIV from chimpanzees?

It’s thought that humans killed and ate the infected chimps or their blood got into contact with a wound or cut. There are 4 different types of HIV which include the groups M,N,O and P, the main strain that has spread throughout the world and is responsible for the highest rate of HIV infections is group M. The earliest that this was detected was back in 1959 where a blood sample was taken from a man in the origin of Congo. From this, we know that HIV first developed in Africa (Kinshasa to be exact) so the next question to answer – how did HIV spread from Africa? In the area of Kinshasa, there are many transport links such as the roads, railways and rivers. It also had an increasing sex trade around the time that HIV was beginning to spread which is believed to have largely contributed to the spread of the disease. This has resulted in racism and discrimination to those who live there.

People only became aware of HIV in the 1980’s when it was officially discovered as a new health condition. In 1983 the disease was given more research by researchers at the Pasteur Institute in France which discovered by the end of 1983 that the unknown disease was finally acknowledged as AIDS and that HIV was the cause of AIDS. It was also concluded that those who were higher risk of the disease were haemophiliacs (a rare condition that affects the blood’s ability to clot) and heroin users. HIV stays in the body for life, however treatment is available and can keep the virus under control and the immune system healthy. Without this  medication people with HIV can develop AIDS and is life threatening. If HIV is caught early and treated with medication, it will not lead to AIDS.

How can you can you get AIDS?

  • Vaginal or anal sex without a condom
  • if your partner has an unknown HIV status, a detectable viral load
  • Sharing injecting drug equipment
  • Oral sex

Treatment for HIV is a medication first started in 1997 which increases a person’s CD4 count and reduces their viral load. This means that those who caught HIV before 1997 developed AIDS and as a result passed away. Treatment is now so effective that it reduces someone’s viral load to undetectable levels within 6 months, maintaining them to have a healthy immune system and this means that they cannot pass on the virus.

 

 

 

 

Chronic Illness Blogs, Mental Health Blogs

Nurse VS GP: which is more beneficial?

NURSE VS GP

For approximately four years, I have seen a variety of health professionals but never really knew which each individual one actually does. After seeing my Nurse Practitioner at the beginning of the week, I asked her what the difference was between her job and my GP’s in terms of what they specialize in and their roles when it comes to providing care for their patients. It is just as beneficial to see a Practice Nurse as it would be seeing a GP. Here’s why;

A Practice Nurse – 

Practice Nurses are registered nurses that work in GP surgeries. They provide care in the following aspects:

  • Collecting blood samples
  • ECG’s
  • Wound management
  • Health advice and vaccinations
  • Child immunisations and advice
  • Womens and Mens health including sexual health
  • Swabs
  • Blood pressure
  • Urine samples

A practice nurse will have more specific jobs within the practice. They can help and advice within minor illnesses however they cannot diagnose or prescribe medications, however you may find that some can. They also run clinics for long term conditions such as Diabetes and Asthma.

A nurse Practitioner is a nurse who has advanced in their nursing with additional training and skills who are usually able to prescribe medications and have more knowledge with chronic or long term illnesses.

Both have access to your medical notes and care plan if you have one put in place. Many Practice Nurses/Nurse Practitioners specialise in different areas of health which can be very helpful.

GP’s – 

GP’s (General Practice) provides care in all common medical conditions, refer patients to specialist hospitals and focus on the patients health in all aspects such as :

  • Physical
  • Psychological
  • Social

This also includes community, home and care in hospital. GP’s who care for patients with chronic illness have the aim to enable them to stay at home and keep them as well as can be. GP’s can also work in different aspects of the hospital such as A and E centres, Discharge planning and may run clinics. They look at the patient’s medical history and the symptoms that they present with at the time of the consultation. If you have a phone consultation they can also give a patient advice via telephone or organise for them to come in for example a blood or urine test.